itsmariliaagain:

give me.

I want some!

UNESCO HERITAGE SITES IN THE CARIBBEAN

caribbeancivilisation:

Barbados

  • Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison

Bermuda

  • Historic Town of St George and Related Fortifications

Cuba

  • Old Havana and its Fortifications
  • Trinidad and the Valley de los Ingenios
  • San Pedro de la Roca Castle, Santiago de Cuba
  • Viñales Valley
  • Archaeological Landscape of the First Coffee Plantations in the South-East of Cuba
  • Urban Historic Centre of Cienfuegos
  • Historic Centre of Camagüey

Curacao

  • Historic Area of Willemstad, Inner City and Harbour

Dominican Republic

  • Colonial City of Santo Domingo

Haiti

  • National History Park – Citadel, Sans Souci, Ramiers

Puerto Rico

  • La Fortaleza and San Juan National Historic Site

Saint Kitts and Nevis

  • Brimstone Hill Fortress National Park

So what exactly is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and how does a place get this designation?

According to UNESCO’s website, to be named a World Heritage Site, a location, whether it’s “a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex or city” must be recognized by them to be “of special cultural or physical significance.”

Before a site can be declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it must first be proposed to the World Heritage Committee by the member country or state in which it is located. If it is determined that the property nominated meets at least one of the necessary requirements, it is inscribed on the World Heritage List.

There are now 936 sites located in 150 countries, with 25-30 added annually.

peroquevaina:

merdereves:

PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT AND READ

Greatest corruption scandal in the Dominican Republic is happening right now.

International and local press remains silent.

After a mandate characterized by rampant estate spending, politicians getting lavish houses and cars, pensions of about USD$12,500 a month for top party officials for four years of work while still having a thousand of dollars government job in another position (Minimum wage is a little over $200), crazy salary hikes, blatant clientelism and tax evasion, millions and millions in government money to fund the official party’s presidential campaign, and many other things, the party ends and the people have to pay the bill.


The congress has approved a fiscal reform that basically screws the people, raising taxes in general and taxing basic food items, as well as small internet purchases that were one of the few ways to circumvent the abusive local retailers (You’d have to pay double the online price + shipping for basically anything).


This problem isn’t solved by taxing, it’s solved by making those responsible pay. Not a single politician has been put in jail or even tried, even those for whom there is incontrovertible evidence of ghastly instances of fraud and corruption. Today the reform was approved by a government controlled Congress in just 19 minutes with no room for debates. Dissenting congressmen were silenced and not given the opportunity to speak. A student was killed during riots in the state university and it’s believed to be the first of several deaths in the near future.


All because a central figure named Leonel Fernandez, until 84 days ago the President of 12 years, personally controls all of the State Powers: Government, Congress and Supreme Court. He also controls most of the media, so even the fourth state is under his power. It’s ironic since countries like Canada gave him an award as Statesman of the Year and named him “the Oracle of Santo Domingo” all because he let a canadian-based gold mining corporation named Barrick started raping the land and destroying the environment of the island. The people have had enough and we need your help, Reddit.

Let us help make some noise so the eyes of the world get turned on our small country.

** 1st picture: Thursday November 8, 2012 | A college student named William Florián Ramírez (21) got shot by a police officer during a protest against the fiscal reform. He was carried that way.

There will be a Dominican student protest for those of us studying abroad (or living outside DR) as a symbol of solidarity at the embassies of the following cities: NYC, Boston, Madrid, Buenos Aires, DC.

3PM, NEXT WEDNESDAY. (link = FB event for protests)

visitheworld:

Evening on the streets of San Juan, Puerto Rico (by pedro lastra).

visitheworld:

Evening on the streets of San Juan, Puerto Rico (by pedro lastra).

anacahona:

telling people who are caribbean “oh like pirates of the caribbean!!!” to show that you know something about the caribbean will make me judge you super hard.

i don’t even care that i’m not god, i will judge the life out of you.

thisisjamaica:

Puerto Rico to Inaugurate the Largest Wind Farm in the Caribbean
Caribbean Business reports that the $215 million project in the south coast town of Santa Isabel will become the largest wind farm in the Caribbean when it starts spinning on Wednesday. The developer of Finca de Viento Santa Isabel, California-based Pattern Energy, has entered into a 20-year power purchase and operating agreement with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (Prepa) for all……….
Don’t forget to check our sister blog The Black Me

Hey, my dad is from Santa Isabel! I saw these when I visited over the summer. My dad said those fields used to be all sugar cane.

thisisjamaica:

Puerto Rico to Inaugurate the Largest Wind Farm in the Caribbean

Caribbean Business reports that the $215 million project in the south coast town of Santa Isabel will become the largest wind farm in the Caribbean when it starts spinning on Wednesday. The developer of Finca de Viento Santa Isabel, California-based Pattern Energy, has entered into a 20-year power purchase and operating agreement with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (Prepa) for all……….

Don’t forget to check our sister blog The Black Me

Hey, my dad is from Santa Isabel! I saw these when I visited over the summer. My dad said those fields used to be all sugar cane.

The Venture: A response to the claim of Taíno extinction

jalwhite:

Dr. Gabriel Haslip-Viera has a problem with Taíno people. Could it be that our increasing presence forces the uncomfortable exposure of not only the “myth of Taíno extinction” but of the deliberate, multi-generational misrepresentation of Caribbean history by the “academy” he so vehemently defends?

In his latest anti-Taíno diatribe entitled “The Myth of Taíno Survival in the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean,” Haslip-Viera reveals that contemporary Taíno continue to strike a nerve in his “status quo” vision of who and what a “Puerto Rican, Dominican, or Cuban” should be. As the 2010 U.S. Census data reveals, however, his conservative view is jarringly contrasted to how a significant number Caribbean people„ particularly “Puerto Ricans,” see themselves. [1]

Haslip-Viera’s article promotes the position that Taíno advocates are using DNA studies to claim “a pure indigenous pedigree.” As the current President of the United Confederation of Taíno People (UCTP), I submit that his assessment of Taíno affirmation is, to use his own words, “patently absurd.” I challenge Haslip-Viera to produce a single document issued by the UCTP that makes such a claim.

The UCTP is well-aware of the interactions between Caribbean communities before and after 1492. However, like our ancestors, the Confederation does not subscribe to the racist “blood quantum” ideology Haslip-Viera is attempting to impose on the Taíno. The concept of a “degree of Indian blood” was set in place not by Indigenous Peoples but by those whose ultimate goal was to terminate “Tribes.” [2]

It is the position of the UCTP that the issue of self-identity should be discussed within the context of the universal right to self-determination. From this perspective, the question becomes “so what if contemporary Taíno are ‘mixed’?” Generally speaking, a majority of the citizens of U.S. federally recognized American Indian Tribal Nations, Native Alaskan communities, and Native Hawaiians are also of “mixed” ancestry. This does not stop them from affirming and promoting their ancestral heritage or speaking out for the recognition of their collective rights.

Read More

comoelfilodelmachete:

Puerto Rico: A Socio-Historic Interpretation, Manuel Maldonado-Denis. 1972. 


Caonabo was a cacique, or Taino chiefs, on the island of Hayti (called Hispaniola by the Spanish). In the book The Peoples of the Caribbean: An Encyclopedia of Archeology and Traditional by Nicholas J. Saunders, Caonabo’s name is defined as meaning “He Who is Like Gold”, or “King of the Golden House”,
Cacique Caonabo took revenge on the Spaniards and brought Fort Navidad to ashes (being a little dramatic here, but the fact remains it was destroyed).
In late winter of 1493, Columbus returned to Haiti, this time bringing with him a hoard of adventurers from Spain to settle in the eastern part of Hispaniola, since they arrived to find La Navidad annihilated. Haiti became divided, the Spaniards vs. the Taino Indians (Arawaks/Caribs). Caonabo more resentful than ever of the presence of the foreigners on his land took it up himself to lead the Tainos into a full-pledged revolt. Columbus recruited the services of Alonzo Ojeda, who tricked Caonabo into being taken as Columbus’s prisoner (they used a trinket that the Tainos thought sacred as a ruse to lure him, and from there they bound the Arawak chief).
(source)

Caonabo was a cacique, or Taino chiefs, on the island of Hayti (called Hispaniola by the Spanish). In the book The Peoples of the Caribbean: An Encyclopedia of Archeology and Traditional by Nicholas J. Saunders, Caonabo’s name is defined as meaning “He Who is Like Gold”, or “King of the Golden House”,

Cacique Caonabo took revenge on the Spaniards and brought Fort Navidad to ashes (being a little dramatic here, but the fact remains it was destroyed).

In late winter of 1493, Columbus returned to Haiti, this time bringing with him a hoard of adventurers from Spain to settle in the eastern part of Hispaniola, since they arrived to find La Navidad annihilated. Haiti became divided, the Spaniards vs. the Taino Indians (Arawaks/Caribs). Caonabo more resentful than ever of the presence of the foreigners on his land took it up himself to lead the Tainos into a full-pledged revolt. Columbus recruited the services of Alonzo Ojeda, who tricked Caonabo into being taken as Columbus’s prisoner (they used a trinket that the Tainos thought sacred as a ruse to lure him, and from there they bound the Arawak chief).

(source)

"… we have usurped all the kingdoms and lordships of the Indies… the natives of whatsoever regions we have entered in the Indies have an acquired right to wage most just war against us and to erase us from the face of the earth, and this right will be theirs until the Day of Judgement."

Bartolomé de las Casas  (via unaguerrasinfondo)
duhdoydorothy:

unaguerrasinfondo:

baddominicana:

botheringtrees:

spitfireinspace:

baddominicana:

unaguerrasinfondo:

why in the fuck are Taíno artifacts from la República Dominicana in a British museum? 

WE dont even have that many as Dominicans so thats a damn good question. :|

Because EMPIRES yayyyyyyyyy
Dear empire-era Britons
People giving you artifacts as gifts: cool
Stealing people’s shit because you think it’d look nice in your museum: UNCOOL

Oh I don’t know. I think it’s kind of interesting and funny to keep these times to imperialism. Obviously if they country of origin wants an artifact back they should get it but if not just let the eduction be.

lol white logic: stolen items only need to be given back if people ask for them back. otherwise its ok to keep.
stay typically douchey.

because white people learning about our culture is so damn important right??? even if it means depriving Caribbean people of knowledge of themselves??? ALL Taíno artifacts belong in the Caribbean - where the people who made those artifacts are buried and where their ancestors continue to live today. and WE do want them back. 

I also hate the argument that goes along with this: “They don’t have the resources to properly preserve and maintain these artifacts.” This is both, not your decision Imperialists and also completely your fault Colonialists. There is often complaint that, for instance, if people get religious items back they will use them and then they won’t be useful because they will get worn down.
THIS ISN’T ABOUT YOUR NEEDS AND WANTS WHITEMAN.

duhdoydorothy:

unaguerrasinfondo:

baddominicana:

botheringtrees:

spitfireinspace:

baddominicana:

unaguerrasinfondo:

why in the fuck are Taíno artifacts from la República Dominicana in a British museum? 

WE dont even have that many as Dominicans so thats a damn good question. :|

Because EMPIRES yayyyyyyyyy

Dear empire-era Britons

People giving you artifacts as gifts: cool

Stealing people’s shit because you think it’d look nice in your museum: UNCOOL

Oh I don’t know. I think it’s kind of interesting and funny to keep these times to imperialism. Obviously if they country of origin wants an artifact back they should get it but if not just let the eduction be.

lol white logic: stolen items only need to be given back if people ask for them back. otherwise its ok to keep.

stay typically douchey.

because white people learning about our culture is so damn important right??? even if it means depriving Caribbean people of knowledge of themselves??? ALL Taíno artifacts belong in the Caribbean - where the people who made those artifacts are buried and where their ancestors continue to live today. and WE do want them back. 

I also hate the argument that goes along with this: “They don’t have the resources to properly preserve and maintain these artifacts.” This is both, not your decision Imperialists and also completely your fault Colonialists. There is often complaint that, for instance, if people get religious items back they will use them and then they won’t be useful because they will get worn down.

THIS ISN’T ABOUT YOUR NEEDS AND WANTS WHITEMAN.

volviomarilia:

Taino Indians Counted of Existence.

“Inside every mestizo there is either one dead Indian, or an Indian waiting to re-emerge”

- Jose Barreiro, Taino

"The English language is nobody’s special property. It is the property of the imagination: it is the property of the language itself."

Derek Walcott (b. 1930).

Nobel prize winning Saint Lucian poet Derek Walcott turns 82 today.

(via fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory)

39 Years After Roe v. Wade Latin American & Caribbean Women Struggle for Abortion Rights

latinosexuality:

[i dig this story in general, but not the title. i understand this comparison to USian laws is connected to transnational experiences many of us have as im/migrants. HOWEVER, comparing our “laws” to make examples of other countries is not the way to go, imho b/c our “laws” are fucked up when it comes to access and support for terminating. This article doesn’t do that necessarily, but the title gives this impression and conflates these topics.]

source

January 22nd marks the 39th anniversary of one of the most significant legal decisions of the 20th century, Roe v. Wade. This landmark ruling from the United States Supreme Court legalized abortion and changed the course of history for women in this country. Yet women in Latin America and the Caribbean continue to struggle for this basic reproductive right.

According to a report released by the Guttmacher Institute this week, 95% of abortions in Latin America are unsafe. In places where abortion is illegal, women often turn to inadequately trained practitioners who employ unsafe techniques or attempt to self-induce abortion using dangerous methods. In Latin America and the Caribbean, nearly one million women are hospitalized each year because of complications from unsafe abortion, and the World Health Organization estimates that one in eight maternal deaths in the region result from unsafe abortion. Poor and rural women are disproportionately affected.

Fear of legal consequences, social stigma, high cost, and lack of access to trained health professionals are major barriers to obtaining safe abortions. Banning abortion does not reduce the numbers of women who attempt it; in fact, the abortion rate is much higher where it is illegal.

Despite these disturbing facts, only 6 of the 34 countries in the region allow abortion without restriction. These countries account for less than 5% of the region’s women ages 15–44.

Over the last decade, gains have been made throughout the region to address unsafe abortion and advocate for decriminalization. In 2007, for example, the Mexico City government lifted the ban on abortion during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. IPPF/WHR’s Member Association in Mexico, MEXFAM, plays a leading role in providing safe abortion services to women and adolescents. In addition to providing legal abortion services in Mexico City, MEXFAM also works to reduce the public health impact of unsafe abortion in states where the law is more restrictive. MEXFAM’s work to reduce maternal mortality washighlighted just last month by ABC’s “20/20.”

Nearly half of sexually active young women in Latin America and the Caribbean have anunmet need for contraception. Fulfilling this need will not only reduce the number of unplanned pregnancies, but also empower women by giving them the freedom to choose when and if they have children. Fulfilling the unmet need for contraception worldwide wouldavert 188 million unintended pregnancies, which would in turn result in 112 million fewer abortions.

Meeting the unmet need for sexual and reproductive health services helps create healthier communities and is a crucial step towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals by 2015.